Tag Archives: purchase music rights

Best Commercials of 2014

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The 2014 top ten brand commerical stories were posted by ad.week.com

http://www.adweek.com/news-gallery/advertising-branding/adweekcoms-top-10-advertising-stories-2014-162074

The number one pick is the Gatorade Derek Jeter salute spot driven by and featuring the iconic “My Way” as performed by Frank Sinatra.

MEGA is the partner that delivered the master, publishing and vocal consent music rights.

Watch the spot again. When an idea driven by the right music, story, film and performance are all captured, it’s simply magical.

What a way to sum up MEGA’s 2014. Thank you again to G and Chiat Day!

Buy Music Rights For A Hit Song

We get asked this question all the time. And songs that are immediately recognizable, that evoke through their music and lyrics an emotion that is key to supporting your visual or interactive communication is a powerful way to connect with your audience.

Copyright owners are in business to license their music or the music of their clients; artists, musicians, songwriters, and music producers. When thinking about budgeting for the cost of music rights, it is important to keep a few key factors in mind:
1. Hit Songs, even for use in one market in the U.S. can cost over $10,000. While there is no general rule of cost per song, master owners and publishers often have a minimum threshold below which they are reluctant to license.
2. Have multiple songs to fit your creative needs. There are over 20 million copyrighted songs and it’s always smart to have alternatives so that you can create leverage for your money when negotiating for music rights.
3. Consider the ways in which your use of the song may help create additional sales and direct promotion for the song owners. Cash is not the only factor that music rights owners consider: media, especially for new works or works scheduled for re-released (think digitally remastered classic rock and hip hop songs) are important assets and if properly presented, can help reduce cash expenditures.

In short, hit songs and music rights are acquired for many different types of uses: TV Commercials, Video Games, Films, YouTube videos, Facebook, Twitter, Social Media and Corporate Presentations but having realistic budgets and options will always get you to a successful result.  More information is available at www.megalv.com.

How Much Do Music Rights Cost

Screen Shot 2014-05-21 at 5.05.33 PM (Graphic by Leah Garaas/MPR.) 

 

Do you want to get music rights for your corporate video, TV commercial, Pandora or Spotify radio ad, or perhaps its music for a Reality TV series or new show?

So many people ask us: how much does it cost to purchase music rights?

That is like asking how much a home or car costs. Meaning, it depends. There are mansions like Led Zeppelin , Pharrell, Kanye and then there are new,  up and coming artists, too numerous to mention, that are producing fantastic songs telling very compelling stories. There are “hits” and there are underground “cool” songs from emerging artists or undiscovered artists and of course, many times, more than one version of a particular song exists.

Lets assume you know exactly what song or songs you require. In this post, I’ll break down the major cost drivers for getting music rights and hopefully this will inform you; knowledge sharing and make you and your organizations; advertising agencies, brands, marketing exec’s, non-profit business managers, tv producers, entrepreneurial start-ups, everyone; smarter as to how to think about your needs and how they impact the cost of getting music rights.

The final costs for music rights are determined by a number of important factors. Here is a good sequence of questions to answer.

1. What is the territory your product or service is sold in? That might be a state, region of a country, entire country, continents; for example: Europe, North America, Asia etc or, yes, the entire world. Territory matters and its good to only ask for what you need.

2. The use cases for the music. Is it for your website? a corporate video, in a game, mobile (is it a ringtone?) a commercial for your brand or service that will run on TV and or online, or in the opening sequence of your reality TV show? Think carefully and think hard. Ask for what you need, but for certain, do not ask for “rights” or use cases you think are marginal. The use cases: television, online, at conventions and meetings (which are referred to as “industrial rights”), theatrical, in social media eg; posts on your FB page or Twitter, internet radio like Pandora or Spotify….these are all “use cases” and boiling them down to what you need and matching those use cases to your financial resources, is essential.

3. What’s the amount of time you will be needing to use the music? Assuming you are not creating an original track, which you can do, again assuming you want a song that’s been recorded, how long do you need it for your campaign or embedded entertainment use? It does not matter how long, or how much actual time (the amount of seconds) of the song you actually use. Funny, but think about it. Great songs can convey an emotional feeling in a matter of a few seconds. So rights holders do not price according to the amount of time from the song you select for most licenses. But they do price music rights, in part, according to how long you’ll use the song. Incrementally, its standard to think about the term as: 3 months, 6 months, a year or longer (yes for use cases like TV and or Film you can buy a perpetual license) but for most advertising or promotional campaigns: the time you’ll need the song matters for cost.  You are, in effect, renting the song for your needs. In most cases, I prefer to think about the minimum time you’ll need vs the maximum. It’ll lower your costs. You can always build options that allow you to expand the term, if everything is working great.

4. In most instances, you will need two licenses; a master recording license and a publishing license. If you are unfamiliar with theses terms and most people are, don’t worry! We’ve outlined their meanings in this post on our blog titled: “How To Buy Music Rights”  http://megalv.com/2014/05/05/how-to-buy-music-rights

5. Once you have all the data organized in steps 1-4 above you’ll need to contact the “owners” of the music, the master owner (the label usually that owns the studio recording) and the publishers (those representing the writers) and propose terms for your licenses.

The two words you should never, ever, use are “how much?”. The last bit of advice is: set a budget, be disciplined. And don’t lock yourself to only one song; there are over 20 million songs out there and with discipline; you’ll get the music you need at a cost that is responsible for your business objectives.

Hopefully this gives you a roadmap to think about how much it costs to get music rights. At MEGA, www.megalv.com, you can see examples of how it all comes together, with big songs and small songs, different use cases and length of uses. This is a field where expertise matters. But we love to knowledge share, so if you’ve a question, reach out and contact us via our website. We’ll be very happy to walk you through the landscape. It is a maze for most folks, and having a trusted guide does help:)

Graphic from http://minnesota.publicradio.org