Tag Archives: Music

Why Great Song Writing Matters

Concert Review Dave Mason and Leon Russell
OK OK How can a guy who love’s new music as much as I do go down a classic rock road like this?
Easy.
If you know my tastes in music you would understand. I love great songwriters—whose music stands up across the spectrum of time.
Last night Mary and I drove down ~75 miles to Tarrytown Music Hall and saw this two aging giants.
The big surprise was the incredible rock guitar brinksmanship displayed by Dave Mason. Did you know that he was 19 when he co-founded Traffic? He wrote “Dear Mr Fantasy”—at 19! AT 19!!!
The show started with “Only You Know and I Know” and I turned to Mary and with a heavy sigh said—oh boy–sounds like a mediocre bar band—-they should not play that song even though it’s a great song–there was little passion–almost like–can we get this out of the way? and then BOOM—-he launched into several songs where his incredible electric guitar playing was in a word–amazeballs (thanks for that Joseph Weinstein)….from “Feelin Alright” to “All Along the Watchtower (memo–he played 12 string on Electric Ladyland with Jimi Hendrix) he absolutely blew us away.
In full transparency, i came to the gig with a old chip on my shoulder. When I was a young concert promoter @ U Penn I booked Dave into an on campus museum hall that had never been used for a concert—sold it out in advance (800 seats) and on the day of the show he cancelled for no apparent reason….You know i was a kid pouring my heart into it and man I was really f’n pissed.
Dave, its cool dude….and then
Leon came strutting on the stage. The dude has looked old–premature grey I think— every since I first saw him at the “Concert For Bangladesh” @ Madison Square Garden live. I was in HS and working that summer at my grandparents Shoul…The Manhattan Beach Jewish Center in their day camp and living with them and candidly—-some of the happiest days of my life. So they announced this gig on WNEW-FM and I turned to my grandmother (Selma Press) and she said let’s get in the car and drive to “Ticketron” in Brooklyn. What looked like thousands—to me maybe tens of thousands of kids were lined up already. She patiently told me to get in line while she would wait in the car. I got the last two tickets to the historic show as the guy behind me wailed when told right after me “sorry he got the last tickets for the show”
I asked a girl to the gig. (here comes a very not PC thingy but so very true)—she was older than me by maybe two years and worked at the camp and had a beautiful face imho and an amazing RACK. At 15 I could not think about much else all summer—I was mesmerized by her and so when I got these tickets—- which were the hottest thing that summer in NYC— I mustered up the courage to ask her to the show and blow me down—- she said YES!…..but she had zero interest in me—a geeky young teenager with all the geekiness imaginable—but did it matter to me—NO! I was taking a hot girl to the most important show in the world (hint—a Beatle was fronting it and if you think they still rock culture today—back in the day it was bigger than Trump! (did I just say that;)
Anyway, in many ways it was the most important live gig of my life because: well for a start–Bob Dylan came out of hiding after his accident and played—with George Harrison and Ringo Starr and Eric Clapton and Klauss Voorman….and who knew about Leon Russell? Until he launched into the now infamous medley including “Jumpin Jack Flash” and sang on his version of Harrison’s “Beware of Darkness”….I feel in love that night—- not with the girl—but with the magic of live music and truth—I pivoted into a live concert promoter soon after (for another post)..and did I say that this was the world’s first BIG Cause event—-that made a real impression on me too–the power of music to shine a light on people in harms way—a BIG DEAL for me
So last night Mary and I—real fans of a master songwriter— “Stranger in a Strange World” “Song for You” Mad Dogs and Englishmen” (he was the Mad Dog)….and what we witnessed was a really feeble man who still could bang on those ivories…but whose voice and presence was a fraction of its former self.
So he turned to the audience many times and before songs told the stories you hung on to every word. About Dylan and Joe Cocker and George Harrison and all Mary and I could do was wish we were not seeing a last gig…..of a man whose live stage presence was omnipotent back in the day—-.
Why do all these legends keep playing—mostly its not for the money if they kept their publishing…
Musicians can play forever if they’ve their chops—you see it in jazz all the time–but rockers who sing too—memo— that’s why Robert Plant refuses to collect a few hundred million and parade himself out to sing songs he wrote when his vocal chords had no limits—as they do now and have had for decades.
So if you are “out there” my friends and get a chance to see “Traffic Jam” Dave Mason’s current tour—do not miss it.
As for Leon—blessed to be in his presence last night and that first night when he changed my world—for–eva eva eva eva
http://ultimateclassicrock.com/45-years-ago-jimi-hendrix-r…/
Oh and I thought to share what songs are enrapturing me today
Have a listen and lmk what you think…
Happy Saturday
https://open.spotify.com/…/…/playlist/40ciVKkCYgPuA8GavJ2k7Z

The Day Jimi Hendrix Claimed ‘All Along the Watchtower’
Jimi Hendrix recorded a definitive cover of Bob Dylan’s ‘All Along the Watchtower’ on January 21, 1968.
ULTIMATECLASSICROCK.COM

Why the 2015 Grammy Awards Matter

Tonight the Grammy’s are the main course for the global entertainment conversation. In the last few years, the organization and show have landed on an informed balance between pop culture fest and stage for stunning artistic expression and disrupting convention, as evidenced by Bob Dylan’s amazing speech last night.

We look not for the winners of the awards, but for those daring artists who break through with stunning performances or provocative commentary. By unleashing the angst that drives most great music, the Grammy’s have once again found that entertainment is not about playing it safe. In today’s media fragmented society, where unrelenting messages from social media fall upon us like a million raindrops  it’s no wonder that great live events bring us together; to celebrate, cheer, rant and rave about  musical art. Just imagine a giant mirror reflecting our collective souls is displayed on right in front of us; stand up close; see if you are a part of the image.

Bravo Grammy’s. You’ve got the mix right. Don’t lose your resolve!

Who will win album of the year?
Who will win album of the year?

Best Commercials of 2014

Screen Shot 2014-12-30 at 11.22.51 AM

The 2014 top ten brand commerical stories were posted by ad.week.com

http://www.adweek.com/news-gallery/advertising-branding/adweekcoms-top-10-advertising-stories-2014-162074

The number one pick is the Gatorade Derek Jeter salute spot driven by and featuring the iconic “My Way” as performed by Frank Sinatra.

MEGA is the partner that delivered the master, publishing and vocal consent music rights.

Watch the spot again. When an idea driven by the right music, story, film and performance are all captured, it’s simply magical.

What a way to sum up MEGA’s 2014. Thank you again to G and Chiat Day!

Buy Music Rights For A Hit Song

We get asked this question all the time. And songs that are immediately recognizable, that evoke through their music and lyrics an emotion that is key to supporting your visual or interactive communication is a powerful way to connect with your audience.

Copyright owners are in business to license their music or the music of their clients; artists, musicians, songwriters, and music producers. When thinking about budgeting for the cost of music rights, it is important to keep a few key factors in mind:
1. Hit Songs, even for use in one market in the U.S. can cost over $10,000. While there is no general rule of cost per song, master owners and publishers often have a minimum threshold below which they are reluctant to license.
2. Have multiple songs to fit your creative needs. There are over 20 million copyrighted songs and it’s always smart to have alternatives so that you can create leverage for your money when negotiating for music rights.
3. Consider the ways in which your use of the song may help create additional sales and direct promotion for the song owners. Cash is not the only factor that music rights owners consider: media, especially for new works or works scheduled for re-released (think digitally remastered classic rock and hip hop songs) are important assets and if properly presented, can help reduce cash expenditures.

In short, hit songs and music rights are acquired for many different types of uses: TV Commercials, Video Games, Films, YouTube videos, Facebook, Twitter, Social Media and Corporate Presentations but having realistic budgets and options will always get you to a successful result.  More information is available at www.megalv.com.

How Much Do Music Rights Cost

Screen Shot 2014-05-21 at 5.05.33 PM (Graphic by Leah Garaas/MPR.) 

 

Do you want to get music rights for your corporate video, TV commercial, Pandora or Spotify radio ad, or perhaps its music for a Reality TV series or new show?

So many people ask us: how much does it cost to purchase music rights?

That is like asking how much a home or car costs. Meaning, it depends. There are mansions like Led Zeppelin , Pharrell, Kanye and then there are new,  up and coming artists, too numerous to mention, that are producing fantastic songs telling very compelling stories. There are “hits” and there are underground “cool” songs from emerging artists or undiscovered artists and of course, many times, more than one version of a particular song exists.

Lets assume you know exactly what song or songs you require. In this post, I’ll break down the major cost drivers for getting music rights and hopefully this will inform you; knowledge sharing and make you and your organizations; advertising agencies, brands, marketing exec’s, non-profit business managers, tv producers, entrepreneurial start-ups, everyone; smarter as to how to think about your needs and how they impact the cost of getting music rights.

The final costs for music rights are determined by a number of important factors. Here is a good sequence of questions to answer.

1. What is the territory your product or service is sold in? That might be a state, region of a country, entire country, continents; for example: Europe, North America, Asia etc or, yes, the entire world. Territory matters and its good to only ask for what you need.

2. The use cases for the music. Is it for your website? a corporate video, in a game, mobile (is it a ringtone?) a commercial for your brand or service that will run on TV and or online, or in the opening sequence of your reality TV show? Think carefully and think hard. Ask for what you need, but for certain, do not ask for “rights” or use cases you think are marginal. The use cases: television, online, at conventions and meetings (which are referred to as “industrial rights”), theatrical, in social media eg; posts on your FB page or Twitter, internet radio like Pandora or Spotify….these are all “use cases” and boiling them down to what you need and matching those use cases to your financial resources, is essential.

3. What’s the amount of time you will be needing to use the music? Assuming you are not creating an original track, which you can do, again assuming you want a song that’s been recorded, how long do you need it for your campaign or embedded entertainment use? It does not matter how long, or how much actual time (the amount of seconds) of the song you actually use. Funny, but think about it. Great songs can convey an emotional feeling in a matter of a few seconds. So rights holders do not price according to the amount of time from the song you select for most licenses. But they do price music rights, in part, according to how long you’ll use the song. Incrementally, its standard to think about the term as: 3 months, 6 months, a year or longer (yes for use cases like TV and or Film you can buy a perpetual license) but for most advertising or promotional campaigns: the time you’ll need the song matters for cost.  You are, in effect, renting the song for your needs. In most cases, I prefer to think about the minimum time you’ll need vs the maximum. It’ll lower your costs. You can always build options that allow you to expand the term, if everything is working great.

4. In most instances, you will need two licenses; a master recording license and a publishing license. If you are unfamiliar with theses terms and most people are, don’t worry! We’ve outlined their meanings in this post on our blog titled: “How To Buy Music Rights”  http://megalv.com/2014/05/05/how-to-buy-music-rights

5. Once you have all the data organized in steps 1-4 above you’ll need to contact the “owners” of the music, the master owner (the label usually that owns the studio recording) and the publishers (those representing the writers) and propose terms for your licenses.

The two words you should never, ever, use are “how much?”. The last bit of advice is: set a budget, be disciplined. And don’t lock yourself to only one song; there are over 20 million songs out there and with discipline; you’ll get the music you need at a cost that is responsible for your business objectives.

Hopefully this gives you a roadmap to think about how much it costs to get music rights. At MEGA, www.megalv.com, you can see examples of how it all comes together, with big songs and small songs, different use cases and length of uses. This is a field where expertise matters. But we love to knowledge share, so if you’ve a question, reach out and contact us via our website. We’ll be very happy to walk you through the landscape. It is a maze for most folks, and having a trusted guide does help:)

Graphic from http://minnesota.publicradio.org

How to Buy Music Rights

You grew up loving music. It helped define your first date, your first kiss, your worst day, your best day; the friendships you value and your passion to work out. You can define the defining moments in your life by the music soundtrack you love. So you know music is very powerful. Songs draws attention, tell compelling stories, just like great branded content, advertising and marketing accomplishes. And now you have your own business. Or, you control or work in the marketing department.  And you want to buy music for a YouTube video, or to place on Facebook, or other social media accompanying visuals that promote your business. Maybe you even want to advertise on Pandora, or Spotify, or a local radio station. Perhaps, as our recent client Gatorade just did, you want a global television spot, with just the right music, to highlight your brand’s support for a large event like World Cup. So how do you start to think about how to buy music for a large or very small brand?

It starts here.

Think about the song that best helps you tell the story of your product or service. You’ve got an ad idea in mind. It’ll have visuals. And those visuals will tell a story; so the music you select should compliment those visuals, reinforce them and the “sound” of the music should directly target your intended audience and drive the cadence of the video you likely will be composing. Think hard. Ask people’s opinion around you; it could be that you have an agency recommending a certain song to go with a certain campaign which is great. But do a gut check; ask trusted customers and colleagues who understand your marketing campaign goals and the value proposition that your company is building to get alignment on the song and music you are considering. It’s really important. Great music can propel a campaign virally and make people want to see it over and over again.  Think about how many times you can listen to the same song vs. how many times you watch the same movie. Music is a powerful tool and needs the real understanding to get it right in a marketing campaign.

Can’t decide on a song? Need help? MEGA can help you find a song that will work for your business. We do it for the biggest brands, often in collaboration with their agencies and yes, also for new and emerging companies who cannot yet afford an ad agency. But we  respect your selections and oftentimes, no one knows better than you; the person in charge of building a brand, what particular song  will drive your business to even greater success.

No doubt, unless you are a musician, or your best friends have a great band, you’ll need or want to buy the version of the song that you know and love. Therefore, you’ll need two licenses: what’s called a “master recording license” and a publishing” (often referred to as a sync license)

Think of a master license as intellectual property that is created when musicians and producers go into the studio and create a “master” recording of a song. Very different from publishing, which refers to the actual songwriting; the union of the musical notes to the lyrics; hence the term “sync license” which is synonymous with “publishing”

You can and some clients do actually buy the publishing rights only and then create a version that becomes their ‘original’ master recording. For example only, if you ever hear a Beatles song used in advertising, it’ll always be a recreated master; the Beatles will not allow their original masters to be used in advertising. MEGA created a really cool version of “Paperback Writer” with the legendary Nile Rodgers producing the B-52’s. You can hear it here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qCdHW9tULHM

The song was produced for the Buick Brand with McCann Erickson as the ad agency. Of course the ad was only licensed for a particular one year term so it’s not on YT anymore; but the song lives on in popular culture!

Master licenses and publishing licenses for a song are negotiated on a most favored nation basis; often called an “MFN” meaning; each side, master and publishing receives the same amount.

You will also need to consider, very carefully, the exact needs you have for the use of the song tied to your ad or campaign. Will it run on your website, how about on your social media  sites? What about YouTube, radio; terrestrial (old school FM) and or digital like Spotify or Pandora? And of course there’s television, mobile, or you might also be thinking of using it at trade shows, or running it in movie theaters…..so much to consider but ever so important because the cost of music rights are negotiated based on: intended uses, geographical territories and finally the time (or term) you need the song rights. You are in effect, borrowing the song, renting it if you like, for a particular brand, for certain territories (which can be global) for a length of time. This changes when buying rights to films or TV shows. But for this article, I’ll focus on buying music for advertising a brand or service. You can also build in options to extend the use; say if your campaign blows up successfully or you get more marketing dollars from HQ or you want to add cities, states or countries to expand a campaign focus. It’s all down to how you negotiate and purchase the rights you need and doing so upfront will always save you money.

When considering your requirements be prudent and careful. So many times we see clients who do not think about their requirements as meeting vs. exceeding their real marketing needs and therefore wind up with music rights they pay for and never actually use. Not smart!

You can also negotiate for some exclusivity of the song use during the term you intend to use it. It may be by category, for example only; all beverages, or automobiles, or you can actually negotiate an exclusive use so that no other brand can use the song in a campaign while you are using it. But all of these issues play into the art of negotiation and ultimately cost.

Now, understanding you believe you have the right song in mind and have developed the use case for the song carefully, you’ll need to negotiate the rights to the song or songs you want. There is no universal price list. You need to know the history of each song use, unless of course its brand new which poses even more negotiating opportunities because your campaign can help promote the song! But history is important. Was it used prior by other brands? when and by whom and where.

For us, at MEGA, there are two words we never utter when buying music rights and those two words are “how much”. Sounds silly? Not so much. Those two words uttered at any time in negotiating rights will cost you thousands or hundreds of thousands of dollars.

You have to set your own budgets. Be realistic. And know when and where you may have to move on to another song if the pricing you feel works for your campaign is not what the rights holders have in mind. Yes, there are experts on the ownership side of licensing songs. All they do every day all year-long is try to extract the largest fees they can from people just like you. Truthfully, the most valuable folks in these positions do much more. They search out opportunities for new music and often are very creative about pitching songs for TV shows, films and advertising. But don’t let that mask their number one job; to maximise the amount they earn for the songs they control.

We view negotiating and buying music rights as a serious business trade, where expertise can help you optimise your marketing campaign and significantly lower the costs of buying music rights. If you’ve any questions feel free to write me at danny@megalv.com or visit our website and learn even more.

 

 

 

 

Hard Work for Gatorade

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sB6AS9bfEx8

You might be seeing this ad all over March Madness 2014…. MEGA organized the music license for the “Hard Work” cadence. Shows how a simple idea, marrying the truth of  consistent exercise to achieve your goals is hard work. I believe this will connect to a broad population who goes to the gym every day expecting “hard work”.

Cashing in Chips at SXSW with Lady Gaga

Lady Gaga and Doritos
Lady Gaga and Doritos

This may be a new low for Music Branding associations.

You might find this article interesting in the New York Times.
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/17/business/media/a-new-model-for-music-big-bands-big-brands.html?hpw&rref=business

The author laments the takeover of SXSW by corporate brands and wonders whether SXSW is a stage for the brands or the artists? More old(r) men lamenting the good old days where Artists were anti-establishment. Get over it. The artists now crave to be the establishment

Few in this new millennium era  care about sponsors and artists cozying up.. The “mega” artists continue to dominate the sponsorships and media attention while amazing new artists who are sleeping on floors and trading their last paychecks for gas money to get to SXSW fight, as they always must, for attention. Bummer? No, Reality check 2014.

No there’s nothing new here. SXSW has just become  a music and technology sponsor-fest….is there something wrong with that? It was inevitable. SXSW is not a 501(c)

What is interesting is the risk reward relationship that unfolded around the Doritos “Bold” sponsorship of Lady Gaga at SXSW with GaGa organizing a performance artist to vomit all over her during the Doritos branded show! That’s Bold.

Its well known that Frito Lay is a world class company and marketing organization. And Lady Gaga is a superstar….one whose running head face into the dark without her long time and also world class manager Troy.

However, this ill fated marketing initiative was bound to bring the wrong kind of attention. Attention, certainly, comes with the GaGa territory. She excels at attention getting. But disgust and laughs? Could not have been the plan.  But does anyone at Doritos believe that this association was good value? Not anymore you can be sure. Having organized some of the largest branded associations with artists in the world, (Pepsi and Beyonce- Led Zeppelin and Cadillac) I must admit to being challenged by artists feeling that they must show their credibility by biting the hand that’s feeding them, but I’ve never, ever seen something  so public and frankly dispensed with such (artistic) contempt….oh in the name of art of course;)

Brands today, more than ever in an instant social media world have to carefully think through the associations they craft they to augment their marketing efforts; especially when the whole point is to drive a conversation. How about this conversation? GaGa has a performance artist barf all over her at a Doritos gig…

Its not easy and I’m not advocating being risk adverse. Just be smart and vet the artist.  Never ever forget that the brighter the star the higher the inner temperature that burns; meaning, artistic genius (and yes even tho I do not care much for her music I do believe GaGa is an artistic genius) comes with a very sharp double edge sword. Is this a case of a smart plan just gone awry or a  plan where you could have seen this freight train coming? IMHO the latter….Meanwhile…Katy Perry and Popchips… much smarter relationship and working!

Transparency: I’m an owner in Popchips but had no hand in its relationship with KP.

Licensing Music: the Basics

Excerpted with permission from an article my good friend Larry Miller wrote in the November/December 2013 “Licensing Journal”…. and I could not think about saying it any better than he did!

The licensing of musical works is unique in that there are two copyrights in every recorded song. The underlying composition by the songwriter(s) usually is controlled by a music publisher. The recorded version of the song by a particular artist usually is controlled by a record label. For example, Darius Rucker recorded a song Bob Dylan wrote, “Wagon Wheel,” for his most recent country album, leading Dylan to be nominated for a 2013 Country Music Award. If someone wants to license Rucker’s recording of this song, a license must be obtained from Rucker’s record label Capitol Records Nashville, which is part of Universal Music Group, and also from Bob Dylan’s publisher. However, there is a second writer on “Wagon Wheel,” Ketch Secor, who wrote verses around Dylan’s original choruses. Both publisher licenses must be obtained to clear 100 percent of the composition.

That is a relatively simple example. In fact, publishing rights often are dramatically complex. The recording “Empire State of Mind” was made famous by Alicia Keys and Jay-Z, but there are seven writers on the track: Burt Keyes, Sylvia Robinson, Angela Hunte, Shawn Carter, Jane’t Sewell, Alicia Augello-Cook, and Al Shuckburgh. How is that? Hunte and Sewell wrote the original version of the song; Jay-Z (aka Sean Carter) liked it but changed the words. Alicia Keys contributed to a new bridge. Then a sample of The Moments’ “Love On a Two-Way Street” was added, which was written by Sylvia Robinson and Bert Keyes. Al Shuckburgh, also known as Al Shux, was the recording’s producer, and as is often the case, was also given a writer credit.

All seven writers presumably have, in theory, worked out their ownership percentages (called shares or splits). But why nine publishers, not seven?

Because publishing assets often are treated much like stock in a company, with writers selling part of their shares to another publisher. All must be licensed, and all must then be accounted for in their payment.

Most other countries, including major music markets such as the United Kingdom, Japan, and Germany, have a single Mechanical Rights Organization. The United States, with its free market approach, does not, although the Harry Fox Agency (HFA) administers mechanical royalty licenses for much of the repertoire, but not all. So all of these licenses must be obtained by bulk licensing or directly with the publishers assuming they can all be identified. However, for music licences intended for use as commercials, in fact, a unique publishing and mechanical license(s) must be negotiated for the intended use (digital, television, radio, industrial…..and or more) and for a specific term.

Voluntary and Compulsory Mechanical Licensing

Unlike any other copyrightable work, under U.S. law, there is a provision for compulsory licensing of musical compositions for recording and distribution as long as the work has been previously recorded; first uses are reserved for the songwriter and directly licensed from the publisher. These uses include CDs, downloads (digital phonogram deliveries or DPDs), and on-demand streams. This license of the underlying composition is called a “mechanical,” a term that dates back to player piano rolls, the earliest known mechanical reproduction of a song. While the compulsory mechanical license provision has existed since 1909, there came to be accepted variations to the terms in business practice. To be in compliance with the compulsory license provision, the entity that wants to reproduce and distribute a work must first send all the publishers a Notice of Intent to use the work, as outlined in Section 115 of the U.S. Copyright Act.